This post is third in a series on book blogging. See the other posts here and here.

Now that you’ve taken your manuscript through all the developmental stages of publishing, you’re reasonably confident your manuscript is the best it can be and that it will change your readers’ lives for the better. If only they could find out about it! Here’s where book bloggers come in.

Book bloggers, like all bloggers, have a variety of interests and reasons for setting up their book review sites. And if you’re researching book bloggers as part of your book’s marketing strategy, you’ve probably heard the most about how important blog traffic is. Of course, you must do the number crunching and research a site’s blog traffic. You can get the straight-up marketing perspective, number crunching and all, from a variety of other sources (for example, see this blog post from Digital Book World). But I’m not going to discuss the number crunching here – not only because others can do that far better than I can, but because I actually believe the quality of the review – and its personal appeal to your target audience – is just as important as traffic, if not more so. (Do you really want a ton of people reading a quickly rattled-off review that completely missed the point of your book?) As a reader who also has a book review site, traffic numbers have little to do with why I review books, and they certainly doesn’t influence how I choose what to read next. I have no problem being the lone voice in the wilderness if I believe it’s for a good cause.

Quality not only includes the general craft of the review, but the care with which he or she read your book in the first place. Choosing which book to read next is a very personal pursuit – which readers know very well, but promotional experts too focused on a market mentality tend to forget. Because you’re trying to reach readers who will feel personally drawn to your book, you’ll want it to appear on sites where reviews are as authentic and personal as possible, written by someone naturally drawn to the kind of work you do. I happen to be a bit turned off by review sites too focused on the bestsellers, or on doing anything possible to get traffic, or on churning out as many reviews as possible. But I am drawn toward ones that feel like I’m getting an honest review from a trusted friend with similar likes and dislikes. As you’re researching book bloggers, you’ll likely discern this quality immediately upon viewing the site – and verify it as you do some poking around.

This approach is strategic, not just emotional – a book blogger’s positive review will speak most powerfully to others like him or her, which is likely to yield more sales if the blogger is speaking to your target audience. One caveat: Remember from the first post in this series that most people trust experts more than peers right now? This means your best bet will be someone not only with the same interests as your target audience, but with some level of writing or publishing expertise. That’s not to say there’s a direct relationship between professional status and quality book reviews. Ironically, objective predictors of quality book reviews have always been hard to define, just as they have been for good writing in any form. The most influential have had to prove themselves through the quality of their writing, just like the rest of us. Their reviews, rather than their professional title, will prove their clout over the long haul. And the beauty of blogging is that the “nobodies” are much easier to find and evaluate, which makes finding the right reviewer for even obscure niches all the more possible.   

This also means that if you can imagine a number of different kinds of readers enjoying your book, you’ll want to find a representative of each of those groups. And yes, that does involve checking out blog traffic, as long as you don’t make that your only criteria. You can always clip an excellent but little-known review and broadcast it far and wide yourself.

Bottom line: book bloggers are your readers, too. Don’t view them as marketing machines – interact with them individually as potential friends and resources for valuable feedback.

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