In my work with nonfiction authors (and in my experience as a reader), I’m noticing that the function of nonfiction books is changing. From the perspective of a reader looking for expertise in solving a problem or in just gaining knowledge, there are so many information options out there now that – for me, at least – the nonfiction how-to book is beginning to take on a more discrete role than just an emblem of expertise.

Entrepreneurism is exploding right now. Many experts are not just writing books, but building businesses around their expertise, with full-service interactive websites, seminars, webinars, workbooks, and coaching opportunities. Experts/authors and readers have more direct contact with each other than ever before. Which is fantastic. But it also means the book is a relatively distant and static way for readers and authors to communicate. So what are readers looking for in a book?

Put simply, when a reader reads your book, it’s their first, small investment in establishing a relationship with you. I’ll put it personally: when I buy a how-to nonfiction book, it means I’ve seen it recommended by someone I trust (this could be an impersonal, trusted curation source or a personal friend). It means I’ve been to your website and I see that you really do have a depth of experience in the topic – and – this is key – you have a number of deeper-access offerings by which I can get more of your expertise. You have other, more personal ways to interact with you and keep the conversation and the learning going. The book is not the end (establishing your expertise) but the beginning (establishing a relationship). (It may seem ironic that we’re all craving relationships more and more now that our relationships are becoming more digitized, but it’s a very logical result. But that’s a topic for another post.)

Even more, I believe what readers want from books is some way of knowing that the author cares about them and about solving their real problems. And alth0ugh the book does function as a way for authors to build trust with their readers, the real proof of trustworthiness is accessibility.

The takeaway from this is that readers aren’t necessarily looking for the author/expert with the most impressive expertise, but simply expertise that meets certain standards of excellence. And perhaps the most important standard of excellence they’re looking for – the one that has the most weight – is service. Not just robotic or same-for-everyone service, but personal service. In other words, a relationship.

The book is often the first tangible investment in a business relationship a reader/prospect can make. Authors who understand this and have a clear path of accessibility and continuing the conversation beyond the book would certainly be more appealing to me than someone who has the highest awards in the field but remains aloof and self-satisfied in her own expertise.

Readers don’t just want the book anymore. They want the author.

If you’re a strong-platform author who is starting to get more intrigued by the possibilities of self-publishing, I just saw two links about e-book distribution today (which led to a third observation) that might interest you as you map out a publishing strategy:
  1. http://andrewhy.de/amazons-markup-of-digital-delivery-to-indie-authors-is-129000/ From Seth Godin’s Domino Project blog today – a link to independent author Andrew Hyde’s discovery of the hidden cost of e-book distribution with Amazon. Apparently he’s determined Amazon marks up digital delivery fees by 129,000% to independent authors selling e-books through Amazon.
  2. BookBaby’s (bookbaby.com) e-book distribution packages – where no “conversion only” packages exist  but they have an amazingly broad distribution platform – is raising their premium package prices from $199 (which includes conversion, distribution to all e-reader stores with free updates, and fulfillment management, so far as I can see) to $250 per book on June 20. This is only a bargain if you actually make money on Amazon.
  3. As an Amazon Prime member, I can borrow many, many e-books for free (including the entire Hunger Games series, which I did, as well as the Association of Independent Authors’ new e-book Self Publishing! Publish Your Books and Avoid the Pitfalls with Advice from Leading Experts and Experienced Authors – to which I’m a contributing author – which I didn’t). I just have to borrow no more than one per month. Considering how long it takes to read most e-books, profit here dwindles even more. Why buy, even at 99 cents, when you can borrow for free and it’s instantly delivered?
What these developments indicate to me is that in terms of profit, strong-platform authors may eventually outgrow e-book distribution services – if they already have lots of traffic to their website, and they’re engaging in widespread marketing anyway, why not just post the file directly on your website for readers to download and keep all the profits? Even with less sales, the math might work out in your favor.
Right now the reason why you WOULDN’T do that is that if you don’t sell on Amazon, for instance, there’s no automatic delivery to your e-reader. And the extra step to download to your computer and then upload to your Kindle would likely be fatal, not just “less.” And the biggest loss of all would be the connection to Amazon’s massive network of readers, via reviews, comments, etc. It’s not just about the money lost; it’s about the leverage and connections lost. And surely that’s worth something.
I realize most successful authors don’t expect to make any money publishing books, and many devote months and years to writing books and finding publishers to provide leverage and credibility, not real income. But what if that’s because the past profit models have conditioned them to believe this is the only option, and they’re choosing to make the best of the situation?
Here’s the point: lesser obstacles than these have been obliterated by new tools and technologies. I feel certain some web-savvy person will come up with a way to circumvent that two-step download from author website to e-reader and maybe make it even more convenient for readers – if he or she had enough focus and motivation and desire. And another reputable platform for seamless networking and commerce might emerge (smaller, perhaps, but tailored for specific niches).
Just more examples of how quickly e-book publishing itself is changing, and how more and more opportunities for profitable independent publishing will unfold for strong-platform authors – IF we focus on the message and not investing too heavily in one kind of media. Let’s keep up with the media, of course, but I think the best authors know that they’re really selling ideas rather than books, and rather than fixating on a particular media, they’ll be ready to ride the wave whenever a new one emerges.

Today is the day when holiday stress is often at its peak: the last few days before vacation, and your last chance to do anything you need to do in 2010. My kids’ vacation begins at 1 p.m. tomorrow, so today is literally my last full day to plow through as much work stuff as possible. Yet amazingly I find myself relatively serene. Why?

Well, the first reason is that a kind publisher extended a December 21 deadline to January 2. But the second is that I realized the source of much of my stress at year’s end comes from expectations I put upon myself – or tradition puts upon me. The nonessential task I decided to drop before the holiday break, and that disproportionally removed stress, was sending client cards and gifts before Christmas. WHAT? How could I consider client cards and gifts nonessential? It’s not that client cards & gifts are nonessential – I look forward to them, actually – but I realized that their arriving before Christmas was. This did two things: first, it relieved the pressure on my schedule, so I could focus on completing clients’ projects on time. Second, it reminded me of the things I am in control over, which was the biggest benefit. Because so much stress comes from our believing we’re not in control of our lives and our schedules. The key is to find what we can control, and to take control.

So I will meet my deadlines today without too much heroic effort, and I will serenely write Happy New Year cards to each client, focusing on new energy and new initiatives, taking all the time I want to take to reconnect with clients who have become friends. Because the most important part of connecting with friends, family, and clients at the holidays – to me, at least – is not the timing, but the quality. I hope I’ll send my gifts out in time next year. But I’m relieved to know that I’ve found one more item in my life that I can adjust where needed – instead of feeling trapped in an either-or scenario where I send cards & gifts by Christmas, or I don’t send them at all.

What either-or scenario do you find yourself trapped in, as you’re scrambling to finish everything by the holiday break (if you take one)? Can you identify the true value of the task, and then adjust either the timing or the scope so you can still achieve the value but perhaps under revised circumstances? Bear in mind that everyone is busier than ever right now, and your adjustment may relieve and inspire someone else – if you’re still fully providing the value you need to provide, that is. What nonessential task will you drop today, so you have energy to meet the real priorities of your business – and the season?

Most of us remember the oft-quoted Edelman Trust Barometer’s 2006 finding that people trust “a person like me” the most. As a result, many businesses and marketers quickly began trying to act less like institutions and more like their customers’ friends or peers, particularly through social networking. Communicating more often and more casually became the goal. Businesses wanted their customers to see them as people like them, in order to trust them, and eventually to buy from them.

But I haven’t seen many implications drawn from this year‘s Edelman Trust Barometer finding that people now trust “an academic or expert” the most. Why the change? My guess, purely based on personal experience and discussions with friends, is that after several years of constant social networking, we’re talking to our online peers way too much about minutiae. With multiple Facebook updates, texts, and tweets daily from people we truly care about and have personal relationships with, we’re in fact drowning in a barrage of minutiae. And this is just from our real friends. To survive, we have to automatically delete all the “relevant” offers and content marketing from even the businesses we’ve opted in to, because we just don’t have time to sift through them.

In 2006, we were just discovering social networking and were craving personal connection – we trusted our peers more than anyone at that point, and certainly more than any faceless institution. But now in 2011, we seem to be craving the curation and discernment of experts, because after experiencing how little of import our peers actually have to say (if they’re talking constantly and we’re listening constantly), maybe experts aren’t as overrated as we thought.  Also, in my humble opinion, this current trend of tsunami-like e-mail marketing has taken advantage of customers’ trust. We opt-in to a mailing list of a business we’ve trusted in the past, and now this business fills our inboxes with multiple “relevant” offers or content per week – sometimes even per day. Even once a week is too often for businesses who offer products or services that I wouldn’t consider buying more than once per quarter. Trust erodes quickly in this kind of environment, because it indicates businesses either don’t know or don’t care about electronic information overload. They just shout louder or more often.

Here’s what I’d like to see happen: I’d like to see businesses act like the experts they are, instead of trying to “talk” to me multiple times a week through Facebook or Twitter or e-mail. What if a real person did this to you in order to be your friend? (Last year, unsolicited email became spam. But now even e-mail marketing lists we opt in to have become spam, because there are just too many. You may be thinking about your business all day every day, but your customers aren’t.) Being a credible, professional expert first is the only way we can develop the trust needed to become friends, and for me to trust more frequent communication from you. But it’s really OK if we only ever stay business partners and never become friends. Those relationships are valuable too.

Most people trying to find a trustworthy product or service provider go to the Internet to search for credible experts – when they need it. And these credible experts usually prove their credibility by putting their expertise front and center as professionals. Content marketing is right on the money if it’s organized by customer need and downloadable online, when customers need it and thus search for it. (I’d even pay for it, if it was from a trusted source and had discernible value in helping me make a good purchasing decision in an objective way. If businesses’ truly put their expertise in terms of customer needs, they could even become quite credible publishers. But that’s another post.) But if businesses’ expertise is split up into a myriad surface bits and sent to my inbox several times a week, it just becomes noise.

Businesses who behave like the calm professional experts that they are, allowing me to find them through search and a recommendation by a trusted and credible source, will get my business every time. And it might even be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

If you, like me, are weighing the pros and cons of the various e-readers out there, you may be wondering if the iPad might be the cost-effective choice (despite its $750 price tag for 3G). Every year brings a new development in web functionality and digital publishing, and no one has quite figured out yet which combination of features works best on which size gadget. Most of us have figured out that the smartphone is just too small for meaningful computing, yet the laptop, at times, is just too big. Many of us are thinking the tablet is the answer. But is now the right time to buy? If the e-reader function is at the top of your must-have list, I believe the answer is no – or at least, not yet.

I bought my Kindle several years ago – it’s not the latest generation, but it’s not the oldest either. But now that real industry standards for epub 3 are out, last week I bought the iPad 2, which supports epub 3 and thus enhanced e-books – something the Kindle can’t do. So far three authors have asked me to integrate enhanced features in their manuscripts and proposals, and since I also do book design, the iPad is unquestionably a game-changer. So the decision to buy was a simple business decision: required product research. But I was also personally interested in the iPad’s functionality as a multi-purpose computing tool – could it replace my laptop too? If it was a good e-reader, and it could let me edit on the run, it would be a considerable bargain.

Here are the pros and cons of each, as one avid cloud-computer and e-reader sees it:

Kindle

Pros:

  • Lightweight (easy to hold in one hand, just like a book)
  • Digital ink is easy on the eyes for long periods of reading
  • Page-turning is easy on the eyes (screen just refreshes instead of sliding, blurry, to the next page like the iPad)
  • Convenient one-hand reading (“next page” button is right where your hand is when holding it – no need to touch the screen)
  • Affordable price for an e-reader ($139 for wi-fi, or $114 if you don’t mind advertisements). More than pays for itself if you consider the saved space on your bookshelves, saved time in ordering, and saved money in e-versions. I buy a LOT of books.
  • Wi-fi vs. 3G: I like my 3G, but there was no wi-fi option when I bought mine. My husband has the wi-fi version, and it doesn’t seem to have slowed him down. Since Kindle is an exclusive e-reader, it’s not a huge inconvenience (for U.S. users, at least) to make sure to download books when you’re in range. You don’t need to be connected to read your books. So the even more affordable wi-fi version seems adequate.
  • Overall – a reader’s e-reader, great for reading standard books and curling up on the couch

Cons:

  • Does not have full Internet browser. So it can’t double as a phone (via skype), a computer, etc. This means it’s another gadget to carry that may duplicate perfectly adequate e-reading technology in your phone or laptop.
  • Does not have enhanced e-book capabilities. Epub 3 has just been released, so almost all publishers are working to take full advantage of its design capabilities. Video, enlarged graphics, and multiple links will be seamlessly integrated with the text, which means reading these books absolutely requires constant connection to the web. A touchscreen will almost certainly be the primary way to interface best with these books – or whatever they will be called. (“Enhanced e-book” is just too long a term to be used for much longer. This is definitely a new animal, but no one’s named it yet – we’re still just describing it, because it’s still being made.) Enter – the iPad.

iPad

Pros:

  • Enhanced e-book capabilities (for significance, see above)
  • Full Internet browser. This is the multifunctional gadget extraordinaire: if you save docs in the cloud it can double as a laptop (as long as you’re just primarily reading them); it syncs to iTunes so it doubles as an iPod, and if you need more screen space it can also double as a second monitor. For some it could function as both a laptop and a more convenient e-reader. The larger screen makes it much more user-friendly than a smartphone – but like a smartphone, it’s still primarily for e-mail, document viewing, and entertainment – until Office and Adobe CS go fully into the cloud.
  • Wi-fi vs. 3G – iPad has both versions, just like the Kindle does, but since there’s no point in buying the iPad if you don’t want to take advantage of its internet browser, the 3G is far more valuable to the iPad than the Kindle, which makes the price differential even greater (see below).
  • Overall, a convenient e-reader for early adopters – for those who prefer their e-reader as a side dish rather than the main course, and who were primarily looking for a larger smartphone screen. The iPad’s main course is convenient Internet access everywhere, taking full advantage of all the web has to offer (which is a lot). But it’s not everything:

Cons:

  • The PRICE – for 3G, which I think you would absolutely need if you depended on its internet features away from home, it runs upward of $750, compared to $139 or less for a Kindle wi-fi.
  • The weight – too heavy to hold for reading in one hand.
  • Backlit screen and motion-sickness-inducing page sliding is harder on the eyes (sliding applies to epub 2 designed books – which, granted, is the past industry standard, but most e-books available now are in this format). Disclaimer: few may be bothered by the blurring of the page when swiping to turn pages, but I read pretty quickly and very often, so this swiping adds up for me.

If you haven’t already deduced, after using the iPad for a little while, I still much prefer my Kindle for reading books. The iPad is just too heavy to hold like a book, and the touchscreen (although it allows for cool design features in epub 3 books like translucent pages that really look like they’re turning) means you have to keep moving your hand to turn the page. (The Kindle has a button right where your hand is when you’re holding the book, so you don’t even have to move your hand. Very easy one-hand reading.) As an e-reader, Kindle is just easier for me to use. I look at a backlit screen all day, so the digital ink is a relief.

Even though it’s beautifully designed, as an e-reader the iPad is too much like a computer, yet as a laptop, it’s too much like a smartphone – it’s too small (even with the add-on keyboard, which is awkwardly small). I need the full features of Microsoft Word to do my work, which isn’t available on the cloud yet. So I can’t say I’d personally recommend it, based on what I need a portable gadget to do.

Bottom line: an iPad is great for people who have limited e-reader needs and limited computing needs, and want the latest and greatest multifunctional gadget that can combine an e-reader and full internet access, where the Internet functionality is the main course and the e-reader’s an added bonus. It’s also a must-have for publishing professionals and designers, as it’s a game-changer right now. But if you’re a heavy e-reader user or a heavy laptop user, it isn’t quite good enough on either count. Also, the price is very high right now, while Kindle’s is pretty low – the differential is about $600. You can get away with the wi-fi Kindle if you’re careful to buy books when you’re in range, if it isn’t too inconvenient. Everyone’s investing in tablet technology right now, and even though Apple’s is the most impressive tablet to date, I don’t think the iPad has got it quite right yet – I’d wait until more workhorse computer programs have a fully functional cloud version for the general public (like Office and Adobe CS) so internet access is enough to do a full day’s work, or until more books are using the epub3 format (there are only a handful right now, and they’re not that helpful yet) – and you decide that’s a good thing. Amazon is working on its own tablet, which may just add features to its Kindle, or be a whole new animal. There was only a year-and-a-half between the first iPad and the iPad 2, so in a couple years, maybe a tablet will be the thing to buy.

But if you’re primarily looking for an e-reader for text-based books and you still need a full laptop, I’d say the iPad isn’t cost effective…yet. Stick with the Kindle for both affordability and functionality.

This post is third in a series on book blogging. See the other posts here and here.

Now that you’ve taken your manuscript through all the developmental stages of publishing, you’re reasonably confident your manuscript is the best it can be and that it will change your readers’ lives for the better. If only they could find out about it! Here’s where book bloggers come in.

Book bloggers, like all bloggers, have a variety of interests and reasons for setting up their book review sites. And if you’re researching book bloggers as part of your book’s marketing strategy, you’ve probably heard the most about how important blog traffic is. Of course, you must do the number crunching and research a site’s blog traffic. You can get the straight-up marketing perspective, number crunching and all, from a variety of other sources (for example, see this blog post from Digital Book World). But I’m not going to discuss the number crunching here – not only because others can do that far better than I can, but because I actually believe the quality of the review – and its personal appeal to your target audience – is just as important as traffic, if not more so. (Do you really want a ton of people reading a quickly rattled-off review that completely missed the point of your book?) As a reader who also has a book review site, traffic numbers have little to do with why I review books, and they certainly doesn’t influence how I choose what to read next. I have no problem being the lone voice in the wilderness if I believe it’s for a good cause.

Quality not only includes the general craft of the review, but the care with which he or she read your book in the first place. Choosing which book to read next is a very personal pursuit – which readers know very well, but promotional experts too focused on a market mentality tend to forget. Because you’re trying to reach readers who will feel personally drawn to your book, you’ll want it to appear on sites where reviews are as authentic and personal as possible, written by someone naturally drawn to the kind of work you do. I happen to be a bit turned off by review sites too focused on the bestsellers, or on doing anything possible to get traffic, or on churning out as many reviews as possible. But I am drawn toward ones that feel like I’m getting an honest review from a trusted friend with similar likes and dislikes. As you’re researching book bloggers, you’ll likely discern this quality immediately upon viewing the site – and verify it as you do some poking around.

This approach is strategic, not just emotional – a book blogger’s positive review will speak most powerfully to others like him or her, which is likely to yield more sales if the blogger is speaking to your target audience. One caveat: Remember from the first post in this series that most people trust experts more than peers right now? This means your best bet will be someone not only with the same interests as your target audience, but with some level of writing or publishing expertise. That’s not to say there’s a direct relationship between professional status and quality book reviews. Ironically, objective predictors of quality book reviews have always been hard to define, just as they have been for good writing in any form. The most influential have had to prove themselves through the quality of their writing, just like the rest of us. Their reviews, rather than their professional title, will prove their clout over the long haul. And the beauty of blogging is that the “nobodies” are much easier to find and evaluate, which makes finding the right reviewer for even obscure niches all the more possible.   

This also means that if you can imagine a number of different kinds of readers enjoying your book, you’ll want to find a representative of each of those groups. And yes, that does involve checking out blog traffic, as long as you don’t make that your only criteria. You can always clip an excellent but little-known review and broadcast it far and wide yourself.

Bottom line: book bloggers are your readers, too. Don’t view them as marketing machines – interact with them individually as potential friends and resources for valuable feedback.

This post is second in a three-part series on book blogging. The first post on the real value of book bloggers for authors is here.

News alert: we are in the midst of an information glut. Most people, myself included, can access far more potentially paradigm-shattering information and entertainment than we could possibly consume. Please, please don’t add to the clutter of the literary marketplace. Before you send your book to a book blogger, first be sure your book makes a genuine contribution to the literary marketplace.

In other words, make sure your book is professionally published, not vanity published. Definitions vary, but I consider a vanity-published book to be just what it sounds like: a book published primarily to build up an author’s vanity and not primarily to share something of value with readers. Self-serving rather than other-serving. For example, if it’s always been your dream to be a published author, and you’re finding traditional publishers’ doors consistently closed to your manuscript, you may decide to self-publish. Shocked at how expensive it is to produce a book, you’ve skimped on editing and design to save money for the printer. Unfortunately what you now have in your hands is a vanity-published book that may delight your friends and family, but is simply not suitable for the general public. If your primary motivation is simply to wear the badge of “published author,” however precariously, then I’m afraid you’ll be publishing your book in vain. Literally. Readers’ time is too tight, and the literary marketplace too glutted, for you to successfully market an amateur book. Having a beautiful cover on poorly written content is just going to make time-starved readers angry.

Yet discerning a book’s quality is a complicated business. For example, the same could be said about another global creative endeavor: the world’s population. Experts tell us the world is overpopulated, yet we still continue to have babies. Genetic tests even give us the option of “editing out” imperfections. But few of us are even tempted by that option – we continue to have baby after imperfect baby. Why? Because the life principle is simply that strong. If your book truly lives within you, needing to be born, then no matter how overpopulated the literary marketplace may seem, there is room for your book. Again, why? Because if it’s alive, and it’s yours, you’re likely to have the internal motivation necessary to care for it. (This is not always true, but it is true very, very often.) You’ll be able to hear the hard truth about its imperfections, develop your craft, and stick with your manuscript until it’s truly ready to meet your readers. Just like parenting your child – you’ll want to know when things are going wrong because you love your child and want to do what it takes to help him or her thrive and eventually become independent.

And as hard as it is to tell these days when our kids are ready to leave the nest, how can we possibly know when our book’s ready? As an editor, I know when a book’s ready when it instantly transports me to another world, without the distraction of typos, uneven margins, or incomplete plot lines. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but it does need to have an independent life of its own.

Fortunately this quality isn’t genetically determined. There is a process (that traditional publishers have followed for years, by the way) that helps ensure our books are mature enough to leave the nest of our personal computers and make a living out in the world. So if you have your published book in your hands and are now nervously wondering whether your manuscript is professionally published or published in vain, here are the crucial developmental steps of professional book publishing:

  1. Write, revise, rest, rewrite, and complete the manuscript in community with other writers. As a developmental editor and writing coach (and sometimes author therapist!), I know several writers who have made a breakthrough in their writing even after they thought their book proposal was complete. It’s worth leaving time for breakthroughs. Throw the calendar or self-created deadlines out the window. Just like there’s no rushing the birth of a child, there’s no rushing the birth of a book. It will come when it’s ready, but you have to provide the right supportive environment and be ready to catch it when it comes.
  2. Manuscript review. Once your manuscript is absolutely complete, get a manuscript review by a well-recommended and professional editor, ideally with a specialty in your field, to make sure you’re on target. (If you’re not sure where to find a trustworthy editor, check out the Editorial Freelancers Association at www.the-efa.org, a very reputable source where you can do a tailored search for a wide variety of editorial, design, and publishing consulting services.) Manuscript reviews should provide a list of general strengths and weaknesses, as well as a detailed list of writing recommendations with examples. Some even include a market analysis, so you know who your target audience is, what your competition is, and, most importantly, whether your book is different enough from what’s out there to be worth buying and reading. In my opinion, it is usually not cost effective to pay an editor to do extensive line-by-line editing for you, unless you are a bona fide publisher with upfront capital who believes so strongly in the concept of the book that it’s worth paying for extra editing to clean up poor writing. (Few trade publishers can even afford to do this anymore.) But if you don’t have the money, you’ve got to put forth the time in improving your craft if you’re going to reach your reader. There are already a lot of transformative, good books out there. Yours should be one of them!
  3. Copyediting. After you’ve incorporated any writing recommendations into your manuscript and you’ve again read it over and believe it is as good as it can possibly get, now it’s time to hire that professional fine-tooth comb: the copyeditor. Best to get an expert in Chicago Manual of Style, the trade publisher’s usual basic style guide. A good copyeditor will do at least two passes, leaving time for queries (questions to the author) and incorporating your responses.
  4. Professional book design. If you have a print version, hiring a professional typesetter with expertise in the industry standard for print publications (currently Adobe InDesign) is absolutely crucial. If you’re publishing online with a pdf (as long as it won’t be printed!), you can convert your Word document to a pdf free and instantly. If you hire a company to convert your manuscript to an e-book (whether for a flat fee or percentage of sales), make sure they allow time for you to review the final e-version with a full proofread and make corrections if needed.
  5. Proofreading. This can be done as another pass by your copyeditor after typesetting and before printing, or after final conversion if electronic. In my opinion, if you trust the editor’s quality, it’s wonderful if you can get the same person to do the copyediting and proofreading, because this person will already be familiar with your manuscript. But whether it’s your copyeditor or a separate proofreader, your manuscript needs one more careful read to get all the errors that everyone missed the first or second time, once it’s in its final form. New errors are often introduced in the book design phase – whether through document conversion errors or the designer’s misunderstanding of your intent.
  6. Review copies. Have a professionally formatted e-book version and the final print-ready pdf available to send out for review. Print copies usually aren’t necessary, but you want your electronic copy to look exactly as the print version would look. Sending review copies out too early, before those last typos or formatting issues are dealt with, can create a less-than-receptive first impression, even if your story is world-changing. If you’re self-publishing, there’s no need to put more obstacles in front of your reader than self-publishing inherently entails. (There are more armchair editors than you think who will become quickly frustrated at even a few obvious errors.)
  7. Printing. It’s very frustrating to go through all these steps meticulously and then find your printer has been sloppy – or doesn’t send a sample copy before the print run or the POD option goes live. Vet your printer as meticulously as your editor or designer.

Only if your book can compare equally well on all levels with a professionally published book should you send it to a book blogger. I don’t say this to discourage any author, but to encourage you: your book is worth your best investment, whether it’s time or money or both. Be absolutely sure this is the best work you can produce, and that you’ve hired a professional consultant at some stage of the process (ideally all) who can reassure you that the story comes through clearly and without distraction. Marketing even an excellent book takes a lot of time and effort – only if you know your book is truly transformative for your readers and is in its best form will you have the long-term stamina for intuitive and effective marketing. Readers know when an author is offering their book out of confidence and deep passion, or out of insecurity or desperation.

But here’s some more encouragement: even though writing and producing a professional book may feel like birthing a child for you, the reader’s investment is much, much less. Economically speaking, buying a book is not like buying a house, or even an airplane ticket – it’s just not a terribly high investment, and most book lovers are willing to take a chance for $10. (My bookshelves are filled with many such chances I’ve taken over the years.) So try not to let perfectionism paralyze you. No parent’s child will ever be perfect – yet we love them and invest in them no less (for little compensation, I might add). The fact is that they are alive, and they spark life in the world around them. That’s their value. So you don’t have to produce a bestseller or the newest installation in the English canon. You just want to know deep down that you’re sharing something of value that’s truly alive, that it’s been priced appropriately, and that it’s ready to stand on its own in the marketplace.